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SAT TUTORING

The Digital SAT, redesigned in 2024, is the college admissions standardized test of choice for most students working with us at Andersen Education. At 2 hours and 15 minutes, with shorter reading passages, shorter sections, and math sections with calculator allowed, it seems like it’s almost too easy compared to its paper predecessor. But don’t be fooled - vocabulary words are now back, the reading passages are still dense and complex, and although the math may have small breadth, it makes up for that in depth (so your child should know their Algebra I and II very well).

We are here to demystify this process and guide your child to take control of their learning college readiness journey.

The Digital SAT's Format

Reading and Writing: Module 1

Students have 32 minutes to answer 27 questions. Passage topics range from literary narratives to poems, history, and research studies. Each question is a new topic (and can contain tables and graphs).

Reading and Writing: Module 2

Students have 32 minutes to answer 27 questions. Passage topics range from literary narratives to poems, history, and research studies. Each question is a new topic (and can contain tables and graphs).

If a student scores at least 70% correct on the previous module, they will get the harder version of this module. Otherwise, they will get the easier version of this module and their score will be capped.

Math: Module 1

Students have 35 minutes to answer 22 questions. Question topics range from percentages, to functions (linear, quadratic, exponential), basic statistics, ad probability. Questions are multiple choice and student-produced responses.

Math: Module 2

Students have 35 minutes to answer 22 questions. Question topics range from percentages, to functions (linear, quadratic, exponential), basic statistics, ad probability. Questions are multiple choice and student-produced responses.

If a student scores at least 70% correct on the previous module, they will get the harder version of this module. Otherwise, they will get the easier version of this module and their score will be capped.

Our individualized approach and experienced tutors can help your child achieve dramatic score increases in a short amount of time (provided your child completes the homework we assign!). Even though the first US students took the digital test in March 2024, we have been studying this test since College Board announced it in January of 2022 and slowly started to release their new practice test materials via the Bluebook app in fall of 2022.

Here's how we do it:

Red line of emphasis under the 3 steps for SAT success at Andersen Education

Mo SM, current student who scored a 32 on her first ACT!

“I am so beyond grateful for all of your help. I have grown so much more confident while working with you and I completely feel the difference in my overall test taking, specifically math test taking, skills. I loved working with you and you’re an absolutely amazing tutor!”

FAQs

Does my child really still have to take this test?

Yes, they (probably) do. Some may think we’re biased, but just because a school says they're test optional doesn't mean that they actually are. What do we mean by this? The school may say they're test optional, but if every student is still submitting test scores, are they still test optional? For example, Purdue says they're test optional, but 97% of students submit test scores. Scores can also be helpful for merit scholarships!

 

The schools they’re applying to won’t even look at their scores. 

Are you absolutely sure that every single school on their list is test blind? If so, then maybe it’s not worth the time and investment to get tutoring for the test. But what happens if one of the schools reverses its decision during your child’s application year? If you aren’t sure, it’s better to have some good scores in your child’s back pocket. 

 

But seriously, we are probably going to not submit their scores.

Full disclosure: It’s best to work with a college admissions consultant about whether or not to submit a student’s scores. We are test prep experts, not counselor/consultants. However, from what we’ve heard, it might be better to submit lower-than-competitive scores because we don’t want admissions officers assuming that the reason why you aren’t sending the scores is because they’re dreadful. 

 

When should my child start studying?

Some companies suggest 9-12 months to 1.5 years (!) to study, but we think 3-6 months of concentrated study starting in the summer between sophomore/junior year and ending in the spring of junior year, is best.

Which materials do you recommend using?

Please visit our Books and Tools page to see which materials we use to prepare our students for all levels of the SAT.

What about the ACT?

There are a few major differences that make a student immediately not even want to try the ACT, so it’s good to know these points ahead of time:

  • the reading passages are longer

  • The math goes all the way up to precalculus and includes matrices, trig identities, geometric/arithmetic sequences, and law of sines/cosines 

  • The science section has complex graphs and tables that can be overwhelming 

 

That said, every student should take a practice ACT, as annoying as it may seem for them. Taking a practice ACT will help the student determine which test they prefer and will eliminate any regrets/disruptive last minute changes to a prep plan. The scores won’t lie, either. 

 

Please see our ACT information page to learn more about whether or not the ACT might be a better fit for your child.

Ready to prepare your child for the SAT?

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